How to set the social prescribing workforce up for success

We know that our health is affected by other ‘factors’ outside of healthcare, hence the need for social prescribing; to help tackle the ‘factors’ in order to improve a person’s overall wellbeing.

How to set the social prescribing workforce up for success:

I am very grateful I sign up, a well-constructed course for the target audience of GP Practice and voluntary and charitable staff involved with social prescribing or community navigation to develop new knowledge and skills to improve wellbeing- Link worker

Our FREE online course helps to:

  • Increase confidence and knowledge: understand link working
  • Be empowered: reduce risk and increase success in link working; role guidance
  • Understand opportunities: whole picture view. Link working career path

We will be digging deeper into this topic in another post, so stay tuned! In the meantime Get FREE members of The National Association of Link Workers

For further information, email info@connectlink.org

What you probably haven’t considered for social prescribing

The relevance and power of being connected

Social prescribing has a role to play in helping to inform and facilitate peer to peer support not only for those who are feeling isolated or lonely but for everyone who would benefit.

There are many things that people are able to handle as a community. We all want to feel supported. There is absolutely nothing in this world that comes close to the value of being connected to others who share similar interests, problems, issues & concerns. It is for this same reason that we are a membership organisation for link workers

Being alienated from your social group is something that happens very often when you are suffering from any kind of debilitating disease. This is something that can make people feel extremely depressed and unhappy. They feel like there is no one out there who can relate, and they even feel uncomfortable and angry when they see everyone else in their lives enjoying their health. These feelings can’t be helped, and they unfortunately create large gaps between people.

The good news is that social connectivity via online and offline has come to change that forever. Now people can find others who are suffering from their same problem or share similar interests. Forums, self help groups are extremely popular outside of social media networks and there are also pages and groups that are dedicated to all kinds of health issues. The point is that people can easily find a place where they can feel accepted and supported.

Having a community that you can see as the place to feel welcome and supported is extremely powerful. Online communities have become a huge part of this process with many groups that are dedicated to support for people who suffer from all kinds of physical and mental health issues.

Social prescribing can help encourage people to start making significant changes in their lives by facilitating social connections and signposting to appropriate support groups. These groups have given a large number of people the chance to find support and to stay motivated as they are dealing with their condition or issues.

Furthermore, it is also important that social prescribing workers are empowered and supported to not only survive but to thrive in the role. Become a member of the National Association of Link Workers

For further information on social prescriber and link worker development, empowerment and support, email info@connectlink.org

Useful links

https://www.selfhelp.org.uk/

https://healthunlocked.com/

https://membership.connectlink.org

How to attract and retain volunteer link workers

People volunteer for various reasons, therefore to attract and retain volunteer link workers, attention must be given to their reasons for volunteering.

Two broad categories of volunteer link workers.

1. Those of state pension age

2. Those NOT of state pension age

The needs of volunteers in the 2 categories may not be the same. For instance, category 2 volunteer link workers may not have a FREE freedom bus pass for travelling and may require travel subsistence.

To attract and retain volunteer link workers consider these 11 questions.

1. What mix of volunteers are you attracting and is the mix representative of the population you are serving?

2. How flexible is your volunteering programme?

3. Do you know your volunteer motivations and aspirations for volunteering?

4. How do you engage with volunteers and make them feel valued?

5. Is there an opportunity to return to volunteering?

6. What provision is available for volunteer subsistence? No volunteer should be out of pocket as a result of volunteering

7. Do you have a minimum period for volunteering? E.g. 6months

8. How attractive is your volunteering programme and what do volunteers get in return for volunteering? See link worker courses

9. What development opportunities and support are available for volunteers? See link worker courses

10. Are you utilising your volunteer skills and knowledge? You can actually create different roles to account for this if there is interest

11. How do you keep volunteers informed of impact and progress?

For more information on how to attract and retain volunteer link workers email info@connectlink.org or for link worker training visit https://elearning.connectlink.org

What every non-clinical ‘link’ worker must know

A non-clinical link worker role:  Some things to think about

The role of a non-clinical link worker isn’t new.  

What is new is the growing evidence that this type of role can play an invaluable part in helping to meet the national priority of ‘improving population health and wellbeing’.

Growing evidence is resulting in:

 

    New interest in the role:

    From organisations: those interested in providing a ‘link’ service and

    From people: those already performing a link worker role or are interested in considering the role (see our Non-Clinical Career Pathway).

    Need for clarification of the role:

    Currently the role is being referred to with different language, different titles dependent on the type of organisation (e.g. health care, social care and community or charity). (see our ‘Connect Link’ support:  roles and scope)

 

Some clarification:

The role of a link worker can be as a paid employee or as a volunteer (we’ll talk about a volunteer role in a different blog post as it brings with it its own unique set of considerations).

Whether as a paid or volunteer role, the function is the same:

Gain understanding and create access:  ‘connect’ and ‘link’

 

     “Spend time understanding clients’ individual situation, needs and aspirations and then

     Help them to access community based support and activities (e.g. peer support groups, debt counselling, housing assistance, etc.) and to utilise their own skills and experience through volunteering.  

     The expectation is that this type of support will help people be well and independent in the community, thereby, in time, reducing demand on primary and secondary care services and preventing the escalation of need.”  (source:  Wigan Community Link Worker (CLW) service)

 

    Click below for links to key documents or sites that may be of interest.

·          Improving population health:  https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/what-does-improving-population-health-mean

·        Wigan-CLW-service-evaluation:  http://www.innovationunit.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Wigan-CLW-service-evaluation.pdf

·        Social prescribing:  what is it?:  https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/social-prescribing